Sunday, July 01, 2012

Scepticism and scorn: Why do 90% of the population not understand?



"Most people are not womb twin survivors.  The idea that the loss of a twin before birth can have any kind of psychological effect on the survivor is greeted by many of them with skepticism and scorn…therefore an early policy decision was to work exclusively with the 10% of the population who are womb twin survivors.”



Here is a question from a puzzled reader:


Question:  why is it a natural response for the 90% of the population who are not womb twin survivors?  Why would 90% of the population who are not womb twin survivors naturally respond with skepticism and scorn to the idea that womb experiences exist as real memories?

Clarification is needed.








If we all born are hardwired with a vague imprint of events in the womb,  and all are affected by pre-birth experience, whether womb twin survivors, or not,  and if everyone has Dream of the Womb, and if the population as a whole has womb experiences, then what isn’t clear is:
a)  what percentage of the population as a whole has the psychological issues described in the book.
b)  whether or not the author is saying that womb twin survivors i.e. 10% of the population, have the same issues as the other 90 % of the population, but for different reasons
c) and, whether or not the author is saying that womb twin survivors have less successful recovery from these issues than the rest of the population because the source of their experience (or trauma) is differen
d) and, whether or not the author is saying that womb twin survivors with less successful recovery, experience more healing when the lost twin approach is used in healing, because the source of their experience was different
e) and finally, why the author believes that all who are born imprinted with a vague imprint of the events of the womb, result in 90% who are not womb twin survivors naturally responding  with skepticism and scorn to the idea that womb experiences exist as real memories. 
After all, if 10% of the population can be brought to understand what happened, why they then experience psychological difficulties, how the nature and extent of their difficulties depends upon what kind of twin was lost in the womb and when, and how recovery can progress once they know what happened, then surely 90% of the population who did not have the lost twin experience but nevertheless also had a Dream of the Womb, can be brought to understand how that Dream informs their life.  If that 90% has psychological difficulties that appear to be the same, but heal differently, that needs to be clarified.


These questions will probably never be answered, not in my lifetime anyhow.  I am baffled by the high level of scepticism that prevails about the Dream of the Womb as a general idea, let alone the lost twin in the Dream. The very word "dream " in this context has got me into big trouble with some people - even those who are womb twin survivors themselves. 



Anyone want to try and clarify these ideas for one confused reader? ( and for me?)


Thank you very much, confused reader, for your detailed feedback!  Much appreciated! 


Read an extract here






1 comment:

  1. I guess it is somehow common for the majority not to accept a truth. This is not only so on the matter of wombtwin. I see it everywhere.

    And as one minority genius once wrote:
    There is no truth without opponents
    There is no misconception without followers

    But in the end the truth will prevail.

    ReplyDelete